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North American Saxophone Alliance Region 6 Conference 2021

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Thursday, February 25
 

3:00pm CST

Roxy Coss Rehearsal
Not open to the public.

Thursday February 25, 2021 3:00pm - 5:30pm CST
Claudia Crosby Theatre
 
Friday, February 26
 

1:00pm CST

Saxophone Quartet Competition
Not open to the public.

Quartet Nova: 1:00-1:15
Quartet Beta: 1:20-1:35
Quartet Trifecta: 1:40-1:55


Friday February 26, 2021 1:00pm - 3:00pm CST
Choir Room Long Hall Room 107

1:00pm CST

3:00pm CST

Concerto Soloists rehearsal
Not open to the public.

Friday February 26, 2021 3:00pm - 5:00pm CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

4:00pm CST

Roxy Coss Soundcheck
Featured Artists
avatar for Roxy Coss

Roxy Coss

Musician Composer Activist
Musician, Composer, Bandleader, Recording Artist, Educator and Activist Roxy Coss has become one of the most unique and innovative Saxophonists on the scene. Winner of a 2016 ASCAP Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award, the Downbeat Critics’ Poll listed her as a "Rising Star" on... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm CST
Claudia Crosby Theatre

7:00pm CST

Opening Concert featuring Roxy Coss
Join Roxy Coss and some a terrific Alabama jazz rhythm section to kick off our NASA Region 6 conference!

Featured Artists
avatar for Roxy Coss

Roxy Coss

Musician Composer Activist
Musician, Composer, Bandleader, Recording Artist, Educator and Activist Roxy Coss has become one of the most unique and innovative Saxophonists on the scene. Winner of a 2016 ASCAP Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award, the Downbeat Critics’ Poll listed her as a "Rising Star" on... Read More →



Friday February 26, 2021 7:00pm - 8:30pm CST
Claudia Crosby Theatre
 
Saturday, February 27
 

9:00am CST

Roxy Coss Master Class and Q&A
Featured Artists
avatar for Roxy Coss

Roxy Coss

Musician Composer Activist
Musician, Composer, Bandleader, Recording Artist, Educator and Activist Roxy Coss has become one of the most unique and innovative Saxophonists on the scene. Winner of a 2016 ASCAP Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award, the Downbeat Critics’ Poll listed her as a "Rising Star" on... Read More →



Saturday February 27, 2021 9:00am - 9:45am CST
Hawkins Hall

9:00am CST

Exhibitors & Sponsors Open

Saturday February 27, 2021 9:00am - 12:00pm CST
Hal Hall of Honor

10:00am CST

NASA Panel on the advancement of women

Saturday February 27, 2021 10:00am - 10:45am CST
Hawkins Hall

11:30am CST

Three Conversations with Matisse by Robert W. Smith
Three Conversations With Matisse - Robert W. Smith 
The composer writes, “I have been fascinated with Henri Matisse and his creative approach for almost a lifetime. Having lived in France for 4 years as a young child, I became interested in his images and use of color and light in multiple mediums.  As a young composer and almost 20 years later, I attended an exhibition of his work at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  
During my visit to the National Gallery, I was able to fully experience the cycle and development of an artist's idea beginning with one of Matisse's paintings of a model seated in the south of France. After completing the one canvas, he asked the model to return to the exact location on subsequent days and at different times to fully explore the setting and light.  The result was a series of canvases with the same model as the subject but with a different perspective and lighting on each visual image.  
Viewing that series of canvases provided an amazing journey through his creative process.  Many times, it was not the original idea that was the most artistic.  His best image was perhaps another canvas of the same idea yet somewhere down the artistic cycle where his creative thoughts had come full circle.
With this three-movement work for saxophone and piano, I explored three different images by Matisse.  Beginning with "The Dance" (1909), the piece will progress to "The Blue Window" (1913). The final movement is based on "Portrait de famille - The Music Lesson" (1916).  Each of these images speak to me on multiple levels.  It is my hope the music will do the same for the saxophone soloist and their audience.”
Movement 1 “The Dance”: In 1909 Matisse received an important commission. An extremely wealthy Russian industrialist named Sergei Shchukin asked Matisse for three large scale canvases to decorate the spiral staircase of his mansion, the Trubetskoy Palace, in Moscow. The large and well loved painting, Dance I at MoMA is somewhat disingenuously titled. Although it is full scale and in oil, Matisse did not consider it more than a preparatory sketch. Yet a comparison between the initial and final versions is instructive. Matisse borrowed the motif from the back of the 1905-06 painting Bonheur de Vivre, although he has removed one dancer. 
In Dance I, the figures express the light pleasure and joy that was so much a part of the earlier Fauve masterpiece. The figures are drawn loosely, with almost no interior definition. They have been likened to bean bag dolls because of their formless and unrestricted movements. The bodies certainly don't seem to be restrained by way. But don't let this childlike spontaneity fool you. Matisse works very hard to make his paintings seem effortless. Imagine for a moment, that instead of this childlike style, Matisse had decided to render these figures with the frozen density of Jacques Louis David. Would the sense of pure joy,... the sense of play have been as well expressed? Matisse has done something that is actually very difficult. He has unlearned the lessons of representation so that he can create an image where form matches content.
The Dance by Henri Matisse has been described as forbidding, menacing, tribal, ritualistic, even demonic. Drum beats almost seem to be heard as the simple pleasure of the original is overwhelmed. What causes these dramatic changes in mood? Beyond the color shift from the original sketch by Matisse, the figures of the 1910 canvas are drawn with more interior line, line which often suggests tension and physical power.  The first movement of Three Conversations With Matisse is based on that primitive interpretation with humans moving with menacing power, yet with a lightness of being.
     Movement 2 “The Blue Window”: The Blue Window is a subdued departure from the artist’s earlier, more colorful works. At this time, Matisse was beginning to gain recognition for his work. Broadly conceived themes that allowed freedom of form and expression suited Matisse’s method of working.
     A major reason for the beauty of The Blue Window is that all the elements of the painting have been carefully aligned and that every aspect of the composition has a relationship with each other. The clarity that Matisse achieved here was in the form of structured vertical and horizontal bands and the cool blue palette that Matisse painted over other sheets of colour. 
Although intellectually sophisticated, Matisse always emphasized the importance of instinct when producing art. He argued that colors, shapes, and lines should dictate how they might be employed in relation to one another and that an artist didn’t have complete control over color and form. He often shared his delight in abandoning himself to the forces of color and design.
     Movement 3 “The Music Lesson”: Matisse often created variations on themes that he had already treated. The Piano Lesson is an abstract work created in 1916 that brings into focus the diligence and discipline of the musician through Cubist technique developed by Pablo Picasso.
In the subsequent and less abstract painting The Music Lesson, Matisse created a variation of his original idea. In fact, Matisse created a painting of a painting and a painting of a sculpture. Matisse removed everything that is not essential from the 1916 canvas. He did, however, keep elements such as the word “Pleyel”, an homage to the French piano maker, and a flowing wrought iron fence.
     So why then retain these letters? And why retain the playful swirling wrought iron fence? According to Jack Flam, a leading Matisse scholar, Matisse wants us to read the letters from right to left and then continue to read past the music stand by jumping to the curving iron fence which he believes to be an abstract expression or visual equivalent of the music (art) that is being produced. The eye is then led to the garden where the flowing lines are repeated and expanded in the foliage of the beautiful French scene.  The use of the Matisse family throughout makes this artistic statement very personal to artist and viewer alike.
Robert W. Smith was inspired by the command and structure of line between the two Matisse musical lesson canvases. From the strict structure of the opening piano statement to the classically-influenced melodic interplay with the saxophone, the piece moves into a more flowing musical environment highlighted by a virtuosic cadenza. The recapitulation of the initial melodic lines completes our music lesson and provides a strong conclusion to the entire suite.

Moderators
avatar for Dave Camwell

Dave Camwell

Associate Professor of Music and Director of Jazz Studies, Troy University
Described as an extraordinary, masterful and virtuosic saxophonist with a mellifluous tone (Fanfare), Dr. Dave Camwell is the Director of Jazz Studies and Associate Professor of Music at Troy University in Alabama. Camwell is a Yamaha, D'Addario, Beechler and Key Leaves Performi... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 11:30am - 11:45am CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

11:45am CST

Piece that Mike likes
piece that mike likes to play

Performers


Saturday February 27, 2021 11:45am - 12:00pm CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

12:00pm CST

Rehearsal - Phil Pierick
Not open to the public.

Featured Artists
avatar for Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick is a saxophonist, improviser, singer, and educator based in Chicago. Equally at home performing a range of music from Renaissance motets to 21st-century works, he has been described as “the Swiss Army knife of saxophonists.” As a soloist and member of the saxophone... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 12:00pm - 1:00pm CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

12:00pm CST

Concerto Soloists rehearsal
Saturday February 27, 2021 12:00pm - 2:30pm CST
Claudia Crosby Theatre

1:00pm CST

Featured Recital - Phil Pierick
Featured Artists
avatar for Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick is a saxophonist, improviser, singer, and educator based in Chicago. Equally at home performing a range of music from Renaissance motets to 21st-century works, he has been described as “the Swiss Army knife of saxophonists.” As a soloist and member of the saxophone... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

1:00pm CST

Exhibitors & Sponsors Open

Saturday February 27, 2021 1:00pm - 5:00pm CST
Hal Hall of Honor

2:00pm CST

Phil Pierick Master Class
Featured Artists
avatar for Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick

Phil Pierick is a saxophonist, improviser, singer, and educator based in Chicago. Equally at home performing a range of music from Renaissance motets to 21st-century works, he has been described as “the Swiss Army knife of saxophonists.” As a soloist and member of the saxophone... Read More →


Saturday February 27, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm CST
Band Room Long Hall 104

3:15pm CST

Cup a Joe
Joe playing something TEST

Performers
avatar for Joseph Girard

Joseph Girard

Columbus State University


Saturday February 27, 2021 3:15pm - 3:30pm CST
Choir Room Long Hall Room 107

7:30pm CST

Featured Guest Artists Concerto Concert
Featuring the Troy University Symphony Band and our guest artists

Saturday February 27, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm CST
Claudia Crosby Theatre
 
Sunday, February 28
 

9:00am CST

Exhibitors & Sponsors Open

Sunday February 28, 2021 9:00am - 1:00pm CST
Hal Hall of Honor

9:30am CST

2:30pm CST

Featured Jazz Soloists Concert
Sunday February 28, 2021 2:30pm - 4:00pm CST
Trojan Center Theater